Jane Namisango is a woman with a purpose. She cares deeply about her country and her community.  In her words, she is “very happy to have been born and raised in Uganda to a humble peasant family and to have had the opportunity to work with my parents on the fertile land that sustains us.”

Born in a small rural village in the Mukono District, Jane is no stranger to hardship. When she was in the third grade, her father died and she had to drop out of primary school. She began working with her mother “digging, planting, and making hand crafts” for the survival of their family.

Spotlight on Jane Supervisor Uganda - October 2016

Today, Jane is the coordinator of the entire Mukono District, supervising 10 cookstove masters, those who oversee construction of cookstoves, in six parishes covering 47 villages. She is a tireless worker and the force behind the incredible expansion of the Cookstove Project in her region.

“I see this project saving the lives of our people,” Jane said recently. “We have a saying in our language ‘okuziyiza  kusinga okuwonyezebwa’ which means prevention is better than cure. These clean cookstoves are protecting the health of our children and families.” 

Jane married at a young age and gave birth to 13 children, but only four of them have survived. When her marriage ended after 15 years, she went back to her mother’s village and eventually assumed the care and support of 10 of her grandchildren and 3 orphans.

It was there in Nsanja that she began volunteering as a community health worker, teaching mothers about malaria prevention and best nutrition practices, and encouraging them to take their children for immunization against polio.

Jane became involved with the Cookstove Project after she was selected to attend a training on the benefits of the improved stoves. She began working with local women in her community and soon became the supervisor of five “cookstove masters” who educate and help village women to build and maintain the stoves in their homes.

Jane Namisango is a woman with a purpose. She cares deeply about her country and her community.  In her words, she is “very happy to have been born and raised in Uganda to a humble peasant family and to have had the opportunity to work with my parents on the fertile land that sustains us.”

Born in a small rural village in the Mukono District, Jane is no stranger to hardship. When she was in the third grade, her father died and she had to drop out of primary school. She began working with her mother “digging, planting, and making hand crafts” for the survival of their family.